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Furyo

How to break in the games industry - an insiders' guide

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Thyank you!

I created my CV and already translated it to english. Cool.

Now, a general question:

What's the difference between "Entry Level" positions and "Junior" positions?

Are they completely the same? What's expected from someone applying for these positions?

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They are entirely the same. What's expected is a clear drive to get better, buckle down and do all the work requested, and follow directions.

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They are entirely the same. What's expected is a clear drive to get better, buckle down and do all the work requested, and follow directions.

Thanks you Furyo for the always informative reply! That's something I could really see myself doing :-D

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They are entirely the same. What's expected is a clear drive to get better, buckle down and do all the work requested, and follow directions.

All that but: Take initiative as well. At least that's what they value(d) about me. I'm not just a minion you can abuse, I got ideas of my own and can put them to use.

Not to be mistaken for arrogance though, I'll gladly accept any directions. But perhaps that's just part of the "clear drive to get better" part.

I suppose it might be a bit different for jobs other than level design where things are a bit more technical and there's less room for interpretation...

Just my 2cents, comments?

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All that but: Take initiative as well. At least that's what they value(d) about me. I'm not just a minion you can abuse, I got ideas of my own and can put them to use.

Interesting. That's something I did a lot when I worked as Game Designer. The game design process there was a complete mess, and as I got more and more involved with the projects, I started to see where it could be improved. I made some notes and shared them with the team and leads. They got surprised (in a good way) about that and we worked together to define the best pipeline for the team at that moment. I always got praised about my pro-activity to improve the process in there. For example, at that time I was reading the book The Art of Game Design (by Jesse Schell) and learned about Interest Curves. I built a graph and applied it to a game I was working on. The lead asked me to share this experience with the rest of the team.

Anyway, I just mentioned it to reinforce what Chimeray said, that initiative/ pro-activity tends to be really valued in a team. :)

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It was kind of general sense that CVs shouldn't be longer than two pages.

But, at the same time, I saw/ read/ watched people saying that a CV should have only one page

I understand you solved the issue already, but others could be interest in this tip from Microsoft HR dept:

It’s okay to use more than one page.

Include all relevant experience rather than cutting things to make your resume fit on one page. That said, be sure your summaries are succinct and your most important information appears on the first page.

INTERVIEWING @ MICROSOFT:RESUME AND INTERVIEW TIPS

I understand your dilemma by the way, I read the same somewhere and I think it can be just formative to make the effort. Other than being succinct at least shows kwnoledge of the software, plus, a two column layout is more readable to the eye... i'm growing to hate the full-spread page.

For the "one-page" argument I personally think that an expert doesn't need to cite all of his works, I mean if on your resume you can write you worked at IL&M and Valve when applying to Blizzard that's pretty much it, I guess :)

Same thing for a first-hire, sounds a bit silly to cite too many things if they don't show different skills or progression in the expertise.

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It was kind of general sense that CVs shouldn't be longer than two pages.

But, at the same time, I saw/ read/ watched people saying that a CV should have only one page

I understand you solved the issue already, but others could be interest in this tip from Microsoft HR dept:

It’s okay to use more than one page.

Include all relevant experience rather than cutting things to make your resume fit on one page. That said, be sure your summaries are succinct and your most important information appears on the first page.

INTERVIEWING @ MICROSOFT:RESUME AND INTERVIEW TIPS

I understand your dilemma by the way, I read the same somewhere and I think it can be just formative to make the effort. Other than being succinct at least shows kwnoledge of the software, plus, a two column layout is more readable to the eye... i'm growing to hate the full-spread page.

For the "one-page" argument I personally think that an expert doesn't need to cite all of his works, I mean if on your resume you can write you worked at IL&M and Valve when applying to Blizzard that's pretty much it, I guess :)

Same thing for a first-hire, sounds a bit silly to cite too many things if they don't show different skills or progression in the expertise.

Thanks for the info ;)

I always heard to avoid to have a CV longer than two pages. I just started hearing to have a one-paged CV a while ago... I had to be a lot more concise with the info/ to filter some stuff (which I think was a good exercise) and to play around with the layout to make everything fit in a single page.

I agree! Depending on the project/ the studio where you worked on, there should be no need for a long CV as that information alone should be enough (I guess).

As we are on this topic, let me link the result that I came up with my current one-paged CV.

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Every (good) recruiter I've talked to have always refuted the "CV should be 1 page" rule. And designers should know this, the proper length of your resume is when taking something away clearly undermines you.

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I agree with this. I think the most important thing to have in the CV is the relevant information, instead of removing something that could make a difference only to end up with a 1 page CV.

When I was updating and translating mine, I think I managed to put all my relevant info in a single page. Maybe in the future I'll have to use another page (which would be fine)...

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I found a video that's really interesting to this topic and I highly recommend:

Chet Faliszek (Valve Software), How to give yourself a job in the games industry.

Eurogamer Expo 2012.

[skip to 2m45s because that's when the talk starts]

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Nothing new at this point, but motivational! :)

I can really identify myself in his talk since what i would really like to do is mapping, but because how things went the only Windows machine I have is an old, not very reliable, laptop with Radeon 9700m that can just run HL2 as it came out in 2004.

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