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Tisky

Where do you start today, if you want to work in the gaming-industry?

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As the title say, i was thinking of trying to learn the ropes again after almost 15 years of abscence from mapping.

Last time i was doing maps it was using valve-hammer, photoshop for textures and simple models using Milkshape 3D (lol). 
 

So anyway, i was wondering if anyone had some fingers to point as where i should start. Im guessing learning 3D Studio max or something like it would be a good start?

Sorry if i posted this in the wrong place!

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First thing would be to decide on what position you would be mostly interested in. Some are easier than others, but you can always branch out to other areas once you get your foot in the door.

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Agree with radu, no point in learning tools just for the sake or learning them. That's a waste of time.

First set a course, then plan what to do to be able to get to your destination. 

If making maps is your goal (pure level design) you don't need to know 3dsmax at all, or any other package. You'll be working with pre existing modular kits, or with simple bsp geo, or even just cubes. A LD job is gameplay, and design, maybe try and help out the theme a little bit too, it depends from person to person.

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15 hours ago, Tisky said:

Thanks for the tips! I thought bsp was old school and everything was made by 3D models nowdays 😅. I guess i gotta read up on how things work nowdays to begin with haha!

If you want to pursue Level Design, you need a portfolio with about 2-3 levels + documentation and be up to date with a few level and game design concepts. Also, given our current trends, you should have something that's multiplayer and open world in your portfolio. I mean, that last bit can vary depending on which studio you apply to, but you never know what games they have planned for the future.

What worked for me to get an ld job at Ubi was having one Wingman map for CS:GO and an open world map in FarCry 5 Arcade, properly documented (well, and prior 9 months of QA work). You can also look at @grapen's portfolio. He had one Wingman map and one Defuse/Bomb map for CS:GO, two FarCry 5 Arcade maps and one small UE4 greyboxed puzzle when he applied at Fatshark. 

You don't need to stress about having a large sample of maps or know a lot of tools (other skills are bonus). What's important is to show that you have a solid understanding of design fundamentals, which will be challenged during the interview and ld test.

Edited by Radu

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12 hours ago, Radu said:

If you want to pursue Level Design, you need a portfolio with about 2-3 levels + documentation and be up to date with a few level and game design concepts. Also, given our current trends, you should have something that's multiplayer and open world in your portfolio. I mean, that last bit can vary depending on which studio you apply to, but you never know what games they have planned for the future.

What worked for me to get an ld job at Ubi was having one 2v2 Wingman map for CS:GO and an open world map in FarCry 5 Arcade, properly documented (well, and prior 9 months of QA work). You can also look at @grapen's portfolio. He had one 2v2 Wingman map and one Defuse/Bomb map for CS:GO, two FarCry 5 Arcade maps and one small UE4 greyboxed puzzle when he applied at Fatshark. 

You don't need to stress about having a large sample of maps or know a lot of tools (other skills are bonus). What's important is to show that you have a solid understanding of design fundamentals, which will be challenged during the interview and ld test.

Thank you, this helps alot! Im glad CS:GO works since i hopefully still know alot of hammer! Didn't know you were a fellow swede also ,@grapen :)

 

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5 minutes ago, Tisky said:

Thank you, this helps alot! Im glad CS:GO works since i hopefully still know alot of hammer! Didn't know you were a fellow swede also ,@grapen :)

 

It works, but people want to see that you can also manage in a modern engine. That's why I recommend fc5 arcade. It's super basic and easy, but gives a good idea of what to expect from a full fledged editor.

Edited by Radu

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1 hour ago, Radu said:

It works, but people want to see that you can also manage in a modern engine. That's why I recommend fc5 arcade. It's super basic and easy, but gives a good idea of what to expect from a full fledged editor.

Stupid question but, you have to buy FC5 to use it i guess? :)

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Yes, but I'd say it's worth it. If you haven't played many open world games, FC5 is pretty easy to pick up. The setup it uses for outposts and missions is pretty common, so you'd also get a good relevant design knowledge.

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On 11/16/2019 at 9:10 PM, [HP] said:

If making maps is your goal (pure level design) you don't need to know 3dsmax at all, or any other package. You'll be working with pre existing modular kits, or with simple bsp geo, or even just cubes. A LD job is gameplay, and design, maybe try and help out the theme a little bit too, it depends from person to person.

Not entirely true HP! I started working in the industry making racing games, and purely using 3DS Max to design /whitebox the tracks (this is still the case at both Codemasters and Playground Games on their racing projects). At Crytek I was using CryEngine to make multiplayer maps, but it helped to know 3DS Max to add my own models to some of my whiteboxes (granted, it wasn't as beneficial during some of the projects in this period). Same thing when it came to whiteboxing in Unreal for the projects I was involved in before moving to Playground Games. Here at PG, I again currently use 3DS Max as my primary tool for whiteboxing content, and our level design test is currently based in Max as well. So I'd say having the ability to whitebox in such a program would be beneficial, not least because the tools within a lot of contemporary game editors are similar to what you'd find in Max anyway, when it comes to manipulating blockout geometry. 

Edited by PaulH

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6 minutes ago, FrieChamp said:

Wow. No other tools allowed?

Not currently no. Our level design job role description specifies that the user will be working with Max so we expect applicants to have knowledge of modelling programs. 

Edited by PaulH

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1 minute ago, Tisky said:

I actually know basic 3Ds max, i guess it doesn't hurt to know it to a degree where you can make your own assets if needed. Knowledge is power 😁 

Sure, it's still by no means a requirement for many places of work I would think, but definitely doesn't hurt to have working knowledge of it. 

 

Your original question is of interest to me too. When I was learning I too used Hammer/Worldcraft and early versions of Unreal to create levels for things like HL2, Unreal Tournament and the SWAT series, but I found myself wondering recently what games people use to learn nowadays. Seems like CSGO is still an option, but what else...

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41 minutes ago, PaulH said:

Sure, it's still by no means a requirement for many places of work I would think, but definitely doesn't hurt to have working knowledge of it. 

 

Your original question is of interest to me too. When I was learning I too used Hammer/Worldcraft and early versions of Unreal to create levels for things like HL2, Unreal Tournament and the SWAT series, but I found myself wondering recently what games people use to learn nowadays. Seems like CSGO is still an option, but what else...

FC5 Arcade is a good option to some degree. It's super limited, but accessible to most people. And you can make your typical open world location in it.

Scripting something in UE4 is also a viable choice.

I think Portal 2 is also relevant? I know some students in Sweden were using it for their portfolio.

You could probably get away with doing something purely just in Sketchup and presenting it like you would during a meeting.

Edited by Radu

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