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kikette

Dishonored : Death of the outsider // Curator and ghost town

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14 hours ago, marnamai said:

Great stuff! @kikette Is the Void engine still using BSP (even if just for blockout) since it's based on id-tech?

Hey Marnamai ! From what i Know, I think that BSP is still used but only for Trigger area. Our Architects directly works their blockout with Maya and then imports modular pieces inside the engine and this is what we get, as Environment artist, to work with :) Moroes could tell better than me about this process.
As far as Void engine is Id tech based, we re wrote around 95% of the source code ahah !

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8 hours ago, kikette said:

Hey Marnamai ! From what i Know, I think that BSP is still used but only for Trigger area. Our Architects directly works their blockout with Maya and then imports modular pieces inside the engine and this is what we get, as Environment artist, to work with :) Moroes could tell better than me about this process.
As far as Void engine is Id tech based, we re wrote around 95% of the source code ahah !

@El Moroes Can you elaborate a little on the workflow?

Blockout in Maya => passed onto environment artists => architects implement gameplay events in editor while artists work on modular assets => env artists bring modular art pieces into the editor to dress up the level?

1) Howdo the architects start implementing the gameplay, is the blockout imported into the editor? (gotta have geo to implement gameplay)
2) What are the benefits of blocking out in an external 3D tool vs in-editor?
3) Since implementing the gameplay and playtesting inevitably leads to iteration, do the architects change the blockout in Maya or in-editor? If Maya, doesn't that create a lot of "unnecessary" back & forwarding between Maya and the editor?
4) The art is modular but does it ever impede iteration? I don't think this is the case, since additional assets can be created when required. But I guess compromises have to be made at some point (content lockdown?)

5) How many architects worked on Death of the Outsider and what's the estimated average production time on a level (mission) from start to end?

Edited by marnamai

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13 hours ago, marnamai said:

Blockout in Maya => passed onto environment artists => architects implement gameplay events in editor while artists work on modular assets => env artists bring modular art pieces into the editor to dress up the level?

That's almost that ; Architects implements the modular assets they did in the editor first before giving it to Env art. Everything should works fine first to avoid bad surprise.
Sometimes, since our engine as it own constraint, It happens that we suggest few change in the layout, to get dirt gradient on a huge surface, etc.
 

 

13 hours ago, marnamai said:


2) What are the benefits of blocking out in an external 3D tool vs in-editor?
3) Since implementing the gameplay and playtesting inevitably leads to iteration, do the architects change the blockout in Maya or in-editor? If Maya, doesn't that create a lot of "unnecessary" back & forwarding between Maya and the editor?
4) The art is modular but does it ever impede iteration? I don't think this is the case, since additional assets can be created when required. But I guess compromises have to be made at some point (content lockdown?)

5) How many architects worked on Death of the Outsider and what's the estimated average production time on a level (mission) from start to end?

2) It's not a benefit, we just do not had the right tools to work with Bsp as smoothly as in Hammer =)
3) The gameplay changes only impacts the "In editor" composition. If someone wants a broken wall somewhere, he just need to swap a generic wall with a broken one and it's over. No more works on the Env art side (Except if someone needs something REALLY specific but we are already aware of.)
4) It isn't the case since each building is already mount in the engine before the "final" art pass :) About the Content Lock down, you just have to make your request before it. If not, too bad ahah !

5) Cannot tell the production time of a level (I guess everybody works on there own level from start to end), but for a building like the curator, It tooks me 1 month to do it, and for the whole Ghost town (Interior + Exterior) around 1 mounth and half. Vertex paint is included in the delay and can takes around 2 weeks to paint each modules in Maya.. since we were not able to do it Inengine :'( :'( :'(  
 

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15 hours ago, marnamai said:

@El Moroes Can you elaborate a little on the workflow?

Blockout in Maya => passed onto environment artists => architects implement gameplay events in editor while artists work on modular assets => env artists bring modular art pieces into the editor to dress up the level?

1) Howdo the architects start implementing the gameplay, is the blockout imported into the editor? (gotta have geo to implement gameplay)
2) What are the benefits of blocking out in an external 3D tool vs in-editor?
3) Since implementing the gameplay and playtesting inevitably leads to iteration, do the architects change the blockout in Maya or in-editor? If Maya, doesn't that create a lot of "unnecessary" back & forwarding between Maya and the editor?
4) The art is modular but does it ever impede iteration? I don't think this is the case, since additional assets can be created when required. But I guess compromises have to be made at some point (content lockdown?)

5) How many architects worked on Death of the Outsider and what's the estimated average production time on a level (mission) from start to end?

 

1 hour ago, kikette said:

That's almost that ; Architects implements the modular assets they did in the editor first before giving it to Env art. Everything should works fine first to avoid bad surprise.
Sometimes, since our engine as it own constraint, It happens that we suggest few change in the layout, to get dirt gradient on a huge surface, etc.
 

 

2) It's not a benefit, we just do not had the right tools to work with Bsp as smoothly as in Hammer =)
3) The gameplay changes only impacts the "In editor" composition. If someone wants a broken wall somewhere, he just need to swap a generic wall with a broken one and it's over. No more works on the Env art side (Except if someone needs something REALLY specific but we are already aware of.)
4) It isn't the case since each building is already mount in the engine before the "final" art pass :) About the Content Lock down, you just have to make your request before it. If not, too bad ahah !

5) Cannot tell the production time of a level (I guess everybody works on there own level from start to end), but for a building like the curator, It tooks me 1 month to do it, and for the whole Ghost town (Interior + Exterior) around 1 mounth and half. Vertex paint is included in the delay and can takes around 2 weeks to paint each modules in Maya.. since we were not able to do it Inengine :'( :'( :'(  
 

Well...thanks @kikette for the answers ^^ 

Just a point about your last question : there was 1 "owner" by level. 
The other architects helped  the "owners" by making a pass of details, optimization, lighting,...
From the beginning to the end, I think we worked 8 months on this project (from prototyping to the finished levels).

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