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Mapcore's UE4 Whitebox Challenge

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Beck has created this for all of you:

 

Ok, so to get started with creating content for UT you will need access to the UT project on GitHub. To gain access to the UT project you will need a license to UE4. You can purchase a license here: https://www.unrealengine.com/register

 

Once you have subscribed head over to here and follow this simple step-by-step guide on how to download the latest UT game: https://wiki.unrealengine.com/Getting_Started_With_Unreal_Tournament

 

The above guide should talk you through getting the latest version of the game along with how to get it opened up in UE4.

Once you have loaded UT into UE4 you should be greeted with the example map which looks a bit like this:

 

XAJO8U1.jpg

 

In here you can press Play up the top right of the editor to run around the example map, try out the movement and give the guns a quick test fire. If you wish to spawn some bots hit Enter and one will just keep running around the map. Ok, so to begin creating a map click on File at the top of the editor and press "New Level..."

 

KANsR4v.jpg

 

Choose between either the Default or Empty Level options (I choose default since the sky is all ready there for me)...

 

jOYrtw0.jpg

 

And you should be greeted with something like this:

 

MPkz8Cv.jpg

 

Now, I normally go ahead and delete the floor tile since it is a static mesh and you'll want to be using geometry to create your levels. This will leave you with a player start location, along with a light source, the sky and some fog. Using the geometry tools at the top left of the editor you can begin creating your level. Simply drag in the primitive you wish to use (for example a box) and you will be given a piece of geometry you can go on to edit. With your geometry selected you can begin to edit it's size within the details panel to the right. Here is a quick run down on what each setting does:

 

REa0ZOZ.jpg

 

First up at the top you can give your brush a name if you so desire. Then within the brush settings you have some things you can modify. The brush type defines whether your brush will be an additive brush or a subtractive brush. Put simply an additive brush will ADD geometry to your world, whilst a subtractive brush will REMOVE geometry from your world. Some examples of where you will use each brush type are creating a wall using an additive brush and creating a hole in that wall, for a doorway or window, using a subtractive brush. Below this you can define your brush shape, pretty self explanatory.

 

And then you have your X, Y and Z values for the size of your geometry. Now you can edit these to begin creating the walls and floors of your level and then simply positioning them where you want them to be placed. If you wish to make a simple room using a box brush, check the hollow checkbox down the bottom to hollow of the box. You can then define the thickness of your walls using the box above this. Once you have created some basic geometry you can go ahead and place some lights and pickups and begin playtesting your level!

 

JuJEPxs.jpg

 

There is a version of the game which is playable online, but I'm not 100% sure how to set that up yet. I will look into it when I get chance soon. Below I've got a list of handy shortcuts and tips but if anyone has any questions please post them in the relevant thread and I will try help out where I can!

 

Thanks guys and happy mapping!

 

 

Some helpful shortcuts and tips!

  • To place a point light quickly simply hold down the "L" key on your keyboard and click anywhere in your scene. A point light will be placed where you click and you can then move it into position!
  • Alt + Dragging an object will create a copy of that object
  • Shift + Dragging an will move the camera along with the object you are moving
  • At the top left of the editors perspective window you can see a couple of grey and orange shortcuts. From left to right there are
    • Your Move, Rotate and Scale widgets
    • The small globe will toggle between world and local transform modes
    • The arrow on a curve will toggle on and off surface snapping
    • The grid will enable or disable grid snapping
    • The number next to the grid will dictate how large or small the spaces are in the grid
    • The angle icon will toggle angle snapping on or off and the number next to it dictates how many degrees to snap to
    • The diagonal arrow is your scale snap toggle along with how much to lock the scale to
    • The camera will allow you to adjust the cameras speed
    • and the finale one will minimise the perspective view to show the orthographic views to 
  • Whilst holding down the right mouse button you can:
    • Use WASD to fly around the level
    • Use the mouse wheel to speed up or slow down the camera on the fl 
  • If you want to snap an object to the floor (For example you have a wall floating above a floor). Simply select the object you wish to snap to the floor and press "End" on your keyboard. This will drop the object down until it hits something. (NOTE: If there is nothing below the object it will not move
  •  

This should be enough to get most of you started. As I said, if anyone gets stuck please shout and I'm sure myself or someone else will be able to help you out. :)

 

Enjoy!

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cool cool cool

 

should maybe be give a tweet to the UT team and do a thread on their forums if not already done :)

 

Yes, it's been posted there as well. On Reddit also. Please feel free to promote it wherever you want.

 

Don't you need the latest ue4 version to be able to run UT4 ? that would mean people who bought it earlier would have to resubscribe(not a big deal, but still)

 

No, it shouldn't matter.

 

PS: I edited the second post with a guide Beck made. It should help.

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Looks like you need to have an active account(subscribed) to be able to access github and download UT4

Yes, this is true. But if people just want to take part in this challenge then a months subscription will be enough.

 

Noticed a few spelling mistakes and such in the guide above (it was late, sorry!) but if anyone gets stuck with anything just post here and I'm sure someone or myself will be able to help :)

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One thing I did not notice in Beck ' goodness is that you can attach a point light to your camera in the perspective window making it easier to white box prior to lighting pass.

Quick question, can we begin mesh work as well as part of the challenge or is it limited to brush work?

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I plan to start a new map for this contest while continuing further work on my previous map. Really looking forward to this.

 

As far as brush use vs model use my two cents on this are that limiting to one or the other is not really in best interest of level design as an art. The reason I say this is that we should focus on solving problems and innovating above limitations. While a block mesh is something we commonly use to block out game play meshes are also a bread and butter tool for us to use as well.

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One thing I did not notice in Beck ' goodness is that you can attach a point light to your camera in the perspective window making it easier to white box prior to lighting pass.

Quick question, can we begin mesh work as well as part of the challenge or is it limited to brush work?

 

 

I plan to start a new map for this contest while continuing further work on my previous map. Really looking forward to this.

 

As far as brush use vs model use my two cents on this are that limiting to one or the other is not really in best interest of level design as an art. The reason I say this is that we should focus on solving problems and innovating above limitations. While a block mesh is something we commonly use to block out game play meshes are also a bread and butter tool for us to use as well.

 

To clarify the quote below:

 

You are free to decide how you are going to do that. Whitebox levels should contain minimal detail but this shouldn’t limit you if you want to go crazy.

 

We just want to get people familiar with UE4. So a whitebox level is minimum but you can take it as far as you want it to go and use whatever means to get there. This is a challenge, not a restriction. Go wild :)

 

@Tomm: Sorry man, apparently I was misinformed. 

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