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NeilJones313

The Art of the first game job.

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So like everyone else on the internet these days I'm an art student. I have read so many books and GDC talks about how to get that first game job. And if it takes you a really long time to land that first job then you just need to get better and try again in a year or so. Don't get me wrong I'm all for getting better everyone can always get better at what they do. But today one of my friends told me today that he has been told to get better for the last five years and has just given up on the game industresty. He is just going to get a job at target and try to pay off his student loads for the next 15 years. After I heard this I started freaking out and spent 20 hours online applying and sending emails (with not one reply) and just trying to find out if I myself would end up like my friend years from now.

I guess what I'm asking is how does everyone feel about how crazy it can be sometimes to find any kind of work with-in games and why isn't there and industry standard for students. when I say standard I mean a model or concept art that every student can look at and say if I can model that or draw that within this amount of time then I will be o.k.

Sorry if this sounds like a rant, I just know a lot of good students and game designers that work at gamestops or walmarts and should be making the game's that make kids want to grown-up and do the same.

kidoncomp.jpg

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Yeah I totally agree with Rick. Most of student of my school who left it at the same time of me didn't find any job because they think what they did at school was enough to get a job. WRONG !!

Being able to make quality levels and other content for an existing (and popular? ) game is far one of the best option to have a job because they know you can work on a real project.

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i want to emphasize the point about criticism. i think that one of the hardest things is to puncture your own ego, and realize that while your work may be of a certain quality, you need to swallow your pride and accept the critique that comes your way. once you've opened yourself in that way, things come much easier. at least that's my personal experience.

Edited by Sentura

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i want to emphasize the point about criticism. i think that one of the hardest things is to puncture your own ego, and realize that while your work may be of a certain quality, you need to swallow your pride and accept the critique that comes your way. once you've opened yourself in that way, things come much easier. at least that's my personal experience.

I agree but how do you know what criticism to take? over the last week people have told me they love my work and other have told me that I shouldn't even try to go into games because my work isn't good at all. So it leaves me with mixed feelings.

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I guess everything is already said, that's a lot of guidelines and it will be very hard and time consuming but if you're not 40 years old you will make it.

I found a good method to learn more even if you don't wanna look for new things. Try to get a nice concept or game screenshot and make the same thing as on the shot. It's like copy/paste but you will see some rules and methods that desingers/artist used.

Oh and by the way. I see you have a very low poly folio. Try to "move to far" with graphics, use crazy polycout and then optimize it when it's to much... I see that lots of people are affraid, they are stiching to oldschool rules of modeling. Make it crazy fucked up and get it down slowly until it will work on most game engines and it will still look epic.

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I agree but how do you know what criticism to take? over the last week people have told me they love my work and other have told me that I shouldn't even try to go into games because my work isn't good at all. So it leaves me with mixed feelings.

TL:DR => Everything Rick said.

Don't take this the wrong way but what are you gonna do with positive feedback? Eat it? Print it and hang it over your bed? "Very nice, I like it". That's ego-boosting but mostly useless feedback.

The best feedback is to the point, honest feedback that's very descriptive about what areas you can improve in. So then you go back to your work and make it better.

Overly negative feedback that doesn't explain anything is pretty worthless as well. (At least you'll know something went wrong :P)

So basically, if people just state their opinion, both positive or negative then that's mostly useless to you. What you want is substance. If you go post on these kind of forums then you'll notice hardly anyone is fishing for compliments, they just want others to spot flaws so they'll end up with a better work. So don't get offended when people critique your work, when people go out of their way to give you feedback it's quite a compliment. It tells you you're not a lost cause and there's potential in your work if you just improve what they said. Why would people spend their time giving feedback on a worthless piece that's not gonna go anywhere, nobody wants to waste their own time!?

Portfolio feedback:

To go back to your portfolio. I hardly see any in-game level work. There's no way of telling if you got a sense of composition, etc etc. Yes, there's artists in the industry that just make props day in day out but if you wanna go that route then you'll need a portfolio that reflects that and justifies your lack of level related work. Meaning, a portfolio filled with kick-ass props, of all sorts and styles and usually some high poly work as well. Try to look for some portfolio's of really good guys that don't do level specific stuff.

Have you ever tried putting your work inside an engine? Making a town scene with those fantasy props for instance (and making more props off course so you have a complete scene). That's gonna make you look way better. Look at it from an industry perspective, how does an employer know you can put this stuff in the engine and that it's gonna end up looking good? They don't, then they might as well hire the guy that made awesome props but also put them into a level... See what I'm getting at? Competition is tough!

Edited by Chimeray

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obviously you want to take critique that compels you to change something in a constructive way. sometimes at work i show off something that i don't even think is flawed, but i do it because i'm blind to what the potential mistakes of my design could be.

like, one of the critiques i would take out of this thread would be (and i'm just paraphrasing others here): put your work inside a game engine, do not just show off work in a 3d package.

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