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Ziklops

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  1. Like
    Ziklops got a reaction from Squad in Level Design Best Practices Examples   
    Hey all,
    I was just curious if anyone knew of any best practice examples of level design for a mechanic, genre of game or a particular game series that are used internally at studios they work, have worked at in the past or you have seen stated by another studio (could be from one of your studio's games or from a competitor's)? So what I mean is a level or part of a level  (could also be a mission or quest) that the team looks at as a guideline for best practices when designing other levels or more specifically, combat encounters - shooting/melee, puzzles, traversal challenges etc. I'm interested in finding other widely considered examples that can be learnt from. Here are some I know of:
    "Knock Knock" in Gears Of War - Cited as one of the levels that Epic Games used as a great example of a combat encounter for Gears. Corinth River in Killzone 2 - At this year's GDC, Blake Rebouche did a presentation called "Level Design Workshop: Balancing Action and RPG in Horizon Zero Dawn Quests" where he mentions a part of Killzone 2 Corinth River as an example used by Guerilla Games for good FPS level design for combat (which is what he used as his basis to improve his moment to moment design for one of the combat spaces in Horizon: Zero Dawn). Dr. Galvani's Apartment in Dishonored (Fullbright whilst working on Tacoma) - "Such a perfect distillation of everything you can do in this game at this point", "A textbook example of a designer taking every available tool in the toolkit and making it into this very focused single interconnected section of the game." - Steve Gaynor Tone Control Episode 18 (Approx 1:30:10). Dust 2 for Counterstrike - Created by Dave Johnston, and widely considered one of the best examples of multiplayer shooter level design. (Making of Dust 2) Anyone else got any others that they know of? I'll add them to the list.
     
  2. Awesome
    Ziklops got a reaction from Evert in Level Design Best Practices Examples   
    Hey all,
    I was just curious if anyone knew of any best practice examples of level design for a mechanic, genre of game or a particular game series that are used internally at studios they work, have worked at in the past or you have seen stated by another studio (could be from one of your studio's games or from a competitor's)? So what I mean is a level or part of a level  (could also be a mission or quest) that the team looks at as a guideline for best practices when designing other levels or more specifically, combat encounters - shooting/melee, puzzles, traversal challenges etc. I'm interested in finding other widely considered examples that can be learnt from. Here are some I know of:
    "Knock Knock" in Gears Of War - Cited as one of the levels that Epic Games used as a great example of a combat encounter for Gears. Corinth River in Killzone 2 - At this year's GDC, Blake Rebouche did a presentation called "Level Design Workshop: Balancing Action and RPG in Horizon Zero Dawn Quests" where he mentions a part of Killzone 2 Corinth River as an example used by Guerilla Games for good FPS level design for combat (which is what he used as his basis to improve his moment to moment design for one of the combat spaces in Horizon: Zero Dawn). Dr. Galvani's Apartment in Dishonored (Fullbright whilst working on Tacoma) - "Such a perfect distillation of everything you can do in this game at this point", "A textbook example of a designer taking every available tool in the toolkit and making it into this very focused single interconnected section of the game." - Steve Gaynor Tone Control Episode 18 (Approx 1:30:10). Dust 2 for Counterstrike - Created by Dave Johnston, and widely considered one of the best examples of multiplayer shooter level design. (Making of Dust 2) Anyone else got any others that they know of? I'll add them to the list.
     
  3. Like
    Ziklops reacted to 2d-chris in TSD-Metro : UT4 contest [WIP]   
    I'm actually recording myself working on a new UT CTF  shell, recorded every second working on it, so far it's about 12 hours of content, going to speed it up 500% which should mean its somewhat understandable and you can see what madness I get up to, my technique is pretty different than the usual working with to, side and front, I work 99% in perspective. 
    Might upload the first hour tonight, if it will be of help. 
     
     
     
  4. Like
    Ziklops reacted to 2d-chris in A Guide for UT Mapping with UE4   
    We've made it easier than ever to access the development tools for Unreal Tournament, in this guide I will share instructions, and some handy links for anyone who would like to build a level for the contest.
    Downloading the game and editor
    Follow THIS link and click "Download UT for Free" (yes, it's free!) Sign in with your account or make one With the launcher open, you should see Unreal Tournament up the top, click on this Download the game (play) and editor (create)
    Epic Games Launcher
    The next step - Getting to know the game
    Even if you are a Unreal veteran, before starting a level, it's wise to play the game for a bit to get a feel for it. Every Unreal Tournament game has it's unique feel, scale and pacing, and UT4 is no different. It is also a good idea to take a close look at the official levels, some have been finished, some are what we call "Shells", these are a great example of proving out a levels gameplay before investing time and effort with art,
    Zaccabus has put together some wonderful guides, everything from basic movement to advanced weapon tips, this will be extremely useful for getting up to speed on what UT4 is all about. Click THIS to go to his YouTube channel.
     
    Basics of the Editor
    Unreal Editor has been widely documented, this should make it quite easy to find specific information you require, but I will provide some handy links for getting up to speed.
    Epic's Map Making Tutorial - Good place to start.
    Sid (Veteran UT level designer) demonstrating the editor - Tips from a pro.
    Unreal Engine Tutorial Playlist - Everything but the kitchen sink (most of this is valid to some degree for UT4).
    Jim Brown (Senior Designer) demonstrates the editor - Good summery of the editors core functionality.
     
    What is Team Showdown Mode?
    Epic was kind enough to provide us with a detailed guide on everything related to mapping for the Team Showdown mode. You can download the PDF version or the Word version.
    Additionally, Nato just posted a guide and discussion over at the official forums, check it out HERE
    How do you test your map in the game?
    We've made it easy to test and share your maps in the actual game, although you can play in the editor, it's always advisable to play it in the real game, we support BOT play which is incredibly useful in the early days of developing a level. Sharing a level will package all custom assets into a single file, making it easy to share with others.
    To add bot support for your level, simply add a "NavMeshBoundsVolume" around your entire level, when you hit build it will make the paths for you Once your level has been Built, you need to do the following to play in the game Click "Share", then "Share this level", in the bottom right of your editor you should see a message telling you the script is running, this can take anywhere from 30 seconds to 10 minuets depending on the complexity of your level.  Once packaged, a prompt will appear asking if you would like to share, before doing this make a note of where the file is being saved, click "Open window to packaged Content Directory, then click no From the Epic Games Launcher, play the game, your map should show up in the list if you make Custom game. If it doesn't show up, you might need to revisit the "world settings" and make sure the game mode is set-up correctly.
    Share button location

  5. Like
    Ziklops got a reaction from blackdog in Player Gating in Level Design   
    @blackdog Thanks, yeah I've seen that link. Yeah I'm looking to do a write up on gating techniques, with some good and bad examples. It makes it a bit easier when clearly classifying the different types. I also want to avoid contradicting the common understanding of terms as well, so I just thought I'd double check on here.
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