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Radu

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Radu last won the day on October 23

Radu had the most liked content!

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About Radu

  • Rank
    Professional ideas guy
  • Birthday May 25

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  • Twitter URL
    https://twitter.com/radu_tanasie

Profile Information

  • Real Name
    Radu Tanasie
  • Employer
    Ubisoft Bucharest
  • Job
    Junior Level Designer
  • Location
    Bucharest

Profile Fields

  • Website
    https://radutanasie.com/

Recent Profile Visitors

8,831 profile views
  1. Could do with some Alan Wake right about now
  2. Honestly, at this point, it sounds more like assumptions and personal projections. It really does seem like the things you've been saying are more aimed towards yourself than anyone else. I remember checking your steam profile about a year ago, when you had written in it that you had someone supporting you with money and were open to donations. Checking it now, you've removed that. You brag about having over 5k hours in the SDK over a period of 7 years, but you criticise people for spending their time making skins to try and earn some extra money on the side? And at the same time, you make assumptions that people do not have their priorities in order while you.. clearly do? Sorry, but there's just a discrepancy between what you're saying and what you're actually doing. If you want to show people that there's a better way, you need to do yourself first. Show them you can be creatively successful and also support yourself.
  3. Think I saw some pop up on twitter. Really like the red tube (that didn't age well) building kit!
  4. https://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/374295/Square_Enix_to_implement_permanent_workfromhome_program_in_December.php "Final Fantasy developer Square Enix will be implementing a permanent work-from-home program as of December 1, 2020. The company, however, isn't doing away with offices entirely, and said that 'home based' staffers will work an average of at least thee days per week from home, while 'office based' employees will spend at least three days per week in the office. That said, it expects around 80 percent of its workforce to be classified as 'home based' as of December -- with status changed allowed each month based on workload intensity."
  5. Just a few spotlights to highlight important areas and also create some longer shadows for drama/depth.
  6. Must have missed that trailer, but early 2021 sounds promising! Good to hear you also got some extra hands to help with it.
  7. Remembered about this the other day. How's it going? Any updates?
  8. Well, that escalated quickly. Yes, not everyone is going to make it because people are different and subsequently vary in skill. And, yes, there are people who are going to be tempted by the money, by the chance of making it big in one hit, but that is not something isolated to skin making for csgo. People have to realise that striking gold in one hit happens once in a million and that it's a bad strategy to religiously dedicate themselves to pursuing that. Creating something of value takes time and you need to take care of yourself. Otherwise, you'll end up dead before you've barely started. Valve is offering people a chance just like you would have in any other field. But I have to admit that compared to a traditional employment situation, you are leaving a lot to chance by doing work without a contract. If you have a contract with an employer, you are getting paid no matter what. However, I don't consider this a problem. It's perfectly clear that this is not a job and pursuing it full time would be a gamble.
  9. Yes, as objective as the csgo team is during the selection process, there's still gonna be a bit of their personal preferences at play. But I believe they don't just pick what they like and instead look at the skin pool as a whole to decide what it could use. The reason why they go for some of the same skin creators is because of reputation. If the said skin maker produces high quality skins that have no contextual issues over time, all the better. Generally, you want to be sure that there's no copyright infringement or offensive materials in these skins. Valve said it themselves, nobody is gonna beat the community's creativity. It makes sense for them to support their current model. You have people from all over the world, with different tastes and experiences, producing high quality content for them to pick from. As for skins that go unused, nobody is forcing people to make these skins. People have been creating skins for their favourite games since forever. If there's a chance of them getting paid in the process, all the better! Sure, there's a high level of competition and some people might be picked over others repeatedly, but that's just the current state of the workshop after years of maturing. Ultimately, it's everyone's personal choice to decide what their time is better spent on and what adds value to their lives. If that means making skins, great!
  10. I bought the Dread X Collections, a bundle of several horror indie games made specifically for it. Just played one that had me fucking terrified. It just kept building towards something happening and then it did... shitty graphics are terrifying in horror for some reason. They really work your imagination.
  11. I had a similar attitude going through highschool and university. After I graduated and got my BA in photography I decided to fuck it and put together a level design portfolio. The first year and a half was a disaster. Although I had some decent understanding of ld, I lacked discipline and was too ambitious with my projects. Finishing stuff has always been an issue for me and it's still an area I'm improving at. What really helped me was to have a concrete goal for the portfolio. At the time, @grapen got his first job as ld and I basically used his portfolio as an end goal. He had 5 levels in total. Though, I decided to only do half of the content for the previous mentioned reasons. I didn't want to keep doing photography jobs, so I started working as QC at my local Ubisoft. During that time, I put together a portfolio featuring a wingman map for csgo and a fc5 map. About 9 months later I landed my first ld job. So there, it can be done! It took about 3 years since I made the initial decision. Bumpy road, but if you're clear with what you want to accomplish, scale things to your ability and have a bit of confidence, you'll get there. It also helps to be active in the community and talk to people who have been there or are currently trying to get their foot in the door. Same period @Lizard was also working to get his first job in the industry, so we supported each other through the ups and down in order to reach our goal. Overall, having a stable job and income in these times has been great.
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