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Jord

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  1. Awesome
    Jord reacted to Vilham in Mapcore Job Census   
    So I had my last week at Splash Damage and my last week for now as a lead, start as a level designer at Arkane next week. Time to get immersed.
  2. Like
    Jord got a reaction from seir in Mapcore Job Census   
    Could you update my info to Lead Level Designer at Rebellion Oxford please?
  3. Like
    Jord got a reaction from Mazy in Mapcore Job Census   
    Could you update my info to Lead Level Designer at Rebellion Oxford please?
  4. Like
    Jord got a reaction from PaulH in Mapcore Job Census   
    Could you update my info to Lead Level Designer at Rebellion Oxford please?
  5. Like
    Jord reacted to Alf-Life in Mapcore Job Census   
    Update: left The Coalition and started earlier this year at Respawn on the Star Wars project.  
  6. Like
    Jord got a reaction from Beck in Mapcore Job Census   
    Could you update my info to Lead Level Designer at Rebellion Oxford please?
  7. Like
    Jord got a reaction from Squad in Mapcore Job Census   
    Could you update my info to Lead Level Designer at Rebellion Oxford please?
  8. Like
    Jord reacted to Beck in Mapcore Job Census   
    Welcome to the industry! Well done!
    Say hi to Akuila and Jethro Jongeneel for me if you see them around.
  9. Like
    Jord reacted to Bastion in Mapcore Job Census   
    I did it.
    I fucking, did it.
     
    Just been offered a job as an assistant level designer with Splash Damage.
    Naturally, I'll bloody take that offer.
  10. Like
    Jord reacted to Beck in Mapcore Job Census   
    Got promoted to Senior Level Designer at Rebellion earlier in the week.  
  11. Like
    Jord reacted to FMPONE in Mapcore Discord   
    Hi all,
    The Mapcore Discord is something we're really having a lot of fun with.
    INVITE: https://discord.gg/unqF28r
    More Chat Moderators are being added and volunteers accepted every day. If you stick around and behave yourself, we'll make you a Chat Moderator.
    Thanks,
    Shawn
  12. Like
    Jord reacted to Beck in Strange Brigade   
    Haha we don't do external alpha/betas as far as I'm aware. We do from time to time allow friends or family in to play. Your Eurogamer buddies are here quite often. Tag along with them next time  
  13. Like
    Jord reacted to Beck in Strange Brigade   
    No, I'm not working on this but have played it and given feedback.
    I see a lot of the levels as I walk around the office and some of them give me a real Goonies vibe.  
  14. Like
    Jord got a reaction from TheOnlyDoubleF in Mapcore Introductions Thread   
    Welcome to the community Robin!
  15. Like
    Jord reacted to selmitto in Mapcore Job Census   
    I am back! Just kidding, I am Anselmo. (wat.jpg)
    It's been a while since my last visit to this great game dev temple! My life has changed, a lot busier now but improving a lot professionally. So it's all good.
    You guys can update the OP mentioning me as
     
    TFG Co (Sao Paulo, Brazil)
    Website: http://www.tfgco.com/
    Al Anselmo - Senior QA Analyst
     
    Thanks
     
  16. Like
    Jord got a reaction from TheOnlyDoubleF in ULTRAFLOW 2   
    Awesome. Gonna grab this later.
  17. Like
    Jord reacted to SirGru in [Team] [Profit Share] Ennoble Studios is looking for an experienced game designer and promoter   
    Hi, my name is Gru and I am the head of Ennoble Studios (2 Steam games, http://www.ennoble-studios.com/).
    I am currently between projects and looking to complete a core team. Currently there's me (programmer, 3+ years in Unity, 5+ years in IT/software employed, asset store developer) and also an experienced 3D artist (several steam games, art lead and consultation on big projects).
    We are looking for a game designer that is reliable and willing to help with the project from ground up. The game will go on Desktop platforms and will be published on Steam (I have the publisher ready). If you are free and willing to commit seriously to something (~6 months scale) then I believe this is a great opportunity for any designer to start with a capable team working on the project from the start.
    We have a few ideas that we're brainstorming currently, but nothing is set in stone.
    We are looking both for a Designer and Promoter.
    Game Designer Tasks:
    - Conceptual game design
    - Design documentation, creation of GDD and similar documents
    - Level design
    - Prototype development
    - Quality Assurance testing
    - Collaborative group work
    - Creation of game mechanics and systems
    - Developing and balancing game mechanics
    - Creation of additional gameplay elements, such as achievements, upgrades, perks etc.
    - Interface conceptual design and testing, both in game and in the menus
    - Creative/narrative writing
    - Creation of game characters, backstory, dialogue, plot
    - Campaign level design with focus on pacing and introduction of gameplay elements
    Game Designer Skills:
    - Be imaginative and creative. 
    - Ability to communicate the vision clearly, on paper or verbally. Ability to articulate it both in terms of crucial game mechanics and tasks required to complete the working. Have good written and verbal communication skills.
    - Be able to work in collaboration with multi-disciplinary teams, in different time zones.
    - Be able to accept constructive feedback on the work. Be able to adjust the vision and iterate based on circumstances. 
    - Have good basic visual design and drawing skills.
    - Be fluent in Unity engine. Understand the basics of scripting.
    - Possess a thorough understanding of game play theory.
    - Have storytelling and narrative development skills.
    - Be skilled in information design and user interface design.
    - Be able to think systematically and strategically.
    Game Promoter Tasks:
    - Promoter: talking to the public, presenting the game, answering questions etc.
    - Making up and posting news, screenshots and stories on the channels, Twitter and Facebook.
    - Editing gameplay screenshots and videos.
    Game Promoter Skills:
    - Be talkative and enthusiastic. Have good people skills. Ability to be polite and patient.
    - Optional: Have other languages fluent in besides English.
    - Ability to communicate the cool and unique features to gamers.
    - Be able to stay current with development of the game and able to present the new features constantly.
    We are looking for serious people willing to commit at least 20 hrs/week to the game.
    I'm not often on this forum, let me know if you're interested on pcbastion[at]gmail[dot]com
    You can find a bit more data about us on my site.
    Regards,
    - Gru
  18. Like
    Jord reacted to TheOnlyDoubleF in ULTRAFLOW 2   
    Boooom We are ranked after just 3 days after the release !!

     
  19. Like
    Jord reacted to TheOnlyDoubleF in ULTRAFLOW 2   
    Guyyyyyysss
    ULTRAFLOW 2 is out on Android! 
    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.ULTRATEAM.ULTRAFLOW2
    We are so proud of it. Hope you'll like it! 
  20. Like
    Jord reacted to clankill3r in WIP in WIP, post your level screenshots!   
    Untextued model with a temporary lighting rig of two diffuse bounces of a blue dome and yellow key.

  21. Like
    Jord reacted to Jacia in WIP Generator_Level   
    Update; 

    ----------
    Hi! I've started working on my first Unreal Tournament level and seeing as you guys are probably way more experienced as me, I figured this would be a good place to ask some feedback.
    At this point I've pretty much only got the rough blockout (Of which I'm probably gonna change a thing or 2 still), but some feedback is already more than welcome ^^
    Also, I'm obviously still playing around with the light (Because I'm new at this and still figuring it out :') ) so please try to ignore the dark & overlit places. I'll try to update this asap. :3
     
     





  22. Like
    Jord reacted to UnknownPredator in Looking for people that are aspiring to work in the game industry   
    Level Designer, I'm 16 and I'm going to be attending college next fall
  23. Like
    Jord reacted to marks in Mapcore Job Census   
    You can update me to Senior Technical Artist btw, still at CA.
  24. Like
    Jord got a reaction from jackophant in Absolutely At a Loss On How To Progress As a Level Designer.   
    So for starters what you're doing so far is awesome. Taking the time to teach yourself a level editor or game engine and the source engine is a great start. I want to put your mind at rest a little and try to give you some focus if level design is really what you're aiming for as opposed to full blown indie developer. I'm not saying you shouldn't try to progress your skills in each area, just don't stress about it if you're not that great at one particular thing. I'm going to try to speak broadly and not really specifically about a shooter or CS:GO maps or the source engine.
    The role of a Level Designer varies from company to company but it's pretty rare for a LD to master all of the skills you listed as your next steps. Unless you're working on a project by yourself or with a really small team there's little chance you'd ever be expected to design levels, create materials, create 3d assets from scratch and code. That being said, having a basic understand of all of these definitely helps, particularly knowledge of a 3d package and understanding of scripting/programming logic. No one will ever expect you to be as good at coding as a coder or as good at 3D art as an artist, though.
    Technical knowledge is great in mainstream game engines such as UE4, Unity, CryEngine as some studios will use these in-house and with solid technical knowledge you'll be able to really hit the ground running with minimal technical training required. A lot of the mainstream game engines have also influenced in-house engine development so it makes it easier to learn engines you've never used before, the skills can be pretty transferable.
    Initially when building a level the first thing you'll want to develop is the game play space, rather than try to thing too much about the aesthetic. It's a good idea to think about what spaces could be and what you want the player to be doing in the environment but how it really looks ultimately often won't be down to you, you'll have artists that create the assets and textures and do the majority of the level dressing. Again it varies from company to company on how much or little control you have during this process but it'll also be your responsibility to work alongside one or more artists to make sure everything is going in the right place and not negatively impacting game play. But you'll have to keep in mind it's a team effort, you're not their boss. As an example everywhere I've worked I've been paired up with an environment artist.
    A general pipeline to follow:
    When creating a level you'll first want to collect a ton of reference for what you're creating. This can be real places, environments from other games you've played, CG renders, concept art or anything that inspires you really. 
    From there you can start to draw some 2D maps, usually top down, showing all of the key areas of the map and where key areas of game play will be such as quests, enemy encounters, boss battles, pickups, puzzles etc.
    After you've got a good 2D map start building your whitebox. You're aiming to build a game play space out of basic geometry which can be interpreted by an artist or anyone else that plays it without any textures or art. At this stage it's important to establish scale and make sure metrics are correct (areas you can jump to, gaps you can crouch/crawl under, walls you could crouch behind for cover etc). Don't worry about textures or making anything look pretty, basic colours will be fine at this point. Think purely about how it plays.
    Add in any game play elements or scripting that are important to the level such as AI paths, puzzle logic, pick up locations, spawn points etc. Don't worry too much about getting everything 100% right first time, this is an iterative process based on feedback from play tests and changes that the level will experience during it's development.
    I should also note that you'll never get it right first time and even if you think you have you'll iterate on it until you're finished, often this will be out of your control but in many cases it will make your level stronger. Playtesting is important even at an early stage so make sure you get plenty of people to play each iteration of your design like everyone does with their CS:GO maps with the Mapcore playtests. This feedback will be invaluable.
    When you or likely your boss is happy that the level plays well you can start to add art to it and this will be a constant process of working alongside artists and some back and forth with the level changing constantly until it is final and gets shipped.
     
    Advice for you:
    If you feel like you're confident with the source engine I'd suggest you have a look at some more advanced engines such as UE4 or Unity as it'll be a valuable learning experience. There are tons of tutorials out there and learning how to construct a level by trying to use the pipeline above might give you a bit more confidence.
    Personally I'd suggest you try to construct a level in a 3D package such as 3DS Max or Maya and then export that to the engine. As it'll give you some extra knowledge and it helps to know a 3D package.
    Practice drawing some 2D maps of existing levels from top down. Think of your favourite CS:GO level and dissect it.
     
    This is all based on my experience so far and talking with co-workers about their previous experiences but will vary a bit depending on company and team size.
    I rambled a bit so I hope that was helpful.
    Jord.
  25. Like
    Jord got a reaction from El_Exodus in Absolutely At a Loss On How To Progress As a Level Designer.   
    So for starters what you're doing so far is awesome. Taking the time to teach yourself a level editor or game engine and the source engine is a great start. I want to put your mind at rest a little and try to give you some focus if level design is really what you're aiming for as opposed to full blown indie developer. I'm not saying you shouldn't try to progress your skills in each area, just don't stress about it if you're not that great at one particular thing. I'm going to try to speak broadly and not really specifically about a shooter or CS:GO maps or the source engine.
    The role of a Level Designer varies from company to company but it's pretty rare for a LD to master all of the skills you listed as your next steps. Unless you're working on a project by yourself or with a really small team there's little chance you'd ever be expected to design levels, create materials, create 3d assets from scratch and code. That being said, having a basic understand of all of these definitely helps, particularly knowledge of a 3d package and understanding of scripting/programming logic. No one will ever expect you to be as good at coding as a coder or as good at 3D art as an artist, though.
    Technical knowledge is great in mainstream game engines such as UE4, Unity, CryEngine as some studios will use these in-house and with solid technical knowledge you'll be able to really hit the ground running with minimal technical training required. A lot of the mainstream game engines have also influenced in-house engine development so it makes it easier to learn engines you've never used before, the skills can be pretty transferable.
    Initially when building a level the first thing you'll want to develop is the game play space, rather than try to thing too much about the aesthetic. It's a good idea to think about what spaces could be and what you want the player to be doing in the environment but how it really looks ultimately often won't be down to you, you'll have artists that create the assets and textures and do the majority of the level dressing. Again it varies from company to company on how much or little control you have during this process but it'll also be your responsibility to work alongside one or more artists to make sure everything is going in the right place and not negatively impacting game play. But you'll have to keep in mind it's a team effort, you're not their boss. As an example everywhere I've worked I've been paired up with an environment artist.
    A general pipeline to follow:
    When creating a level you'll first want to collect a ton of reference for what you're creating. This can be real places, environments from other games you've played, CG renders, concept art or anything that inspires you really. 
    From there you can start to draw some 2D maps, usually top down, showing all of the key areas of the map and where key areas of game play will be such as quests, enemy encounters, boss battles, pickups, puzzles etc.
    After you've got a good 2D map start building your whitebox. You're aiming to build a game play space out of basic geometry which can be interpreted by an artist or anyone else that plays it without any textures or art. At this stage it's important to establish scale and make sure metrics are correct (areas you can jump to, gaps you can crouch/crawl under, walls you could crouch behind for cover etc). Don't worry about textures or making anything look pretty, basic colours will be fine at this point. Think purely about how it plays.
    Add in any game play elements or scripting that are important to the level such as AI paths, puzzle logic, pick up locations, spawn points etc. Don't worry too much about getting everything 100% right first time, this is an iterative process based on feedback from play tests and changes that the level will experience during it's development.
    I should also note that you'll never get it right first time and even if you think you have you'll iterate on it until you're finished, often this will be out of your control but in many cases it will make your level stronger. Playtesting is important even at an early stage so make sure you get plenty of people to play each iteration of your design like everyone does with their CS:GO maps with the Mapcore playtests. This feedback will be invaluable.
    When you or likely your boss is happy that the level plays well you can start to add art to it and this will be a constant process of working alongside artists and some back and forth with the level changing constantly until it is final and gets shipped.
     
    Advice for you:
    If you feel like you're confident with the source engine I'd suggest you have a look at some more advanced engines such as UE4 or Unity as it'll be a valuable learning experience. There are tons of tutorials out there and learning how to construct a level by trying to use the pipeline above might give you a bit more confidence.
    Personally I'd suggest you try to construct a level in a 3D package such as 3DS Max or Maya and then export that to the engine. As it'll give you some extra knowledge and it helps to know a 3D package.
    Practice drawing some 2D maps of existing levels from top down. Think of your favourite CS:GO level and dissect it.
     
    This is all based on my experience so far and talking with co-workers about their previous experiences but will vary a bit depending on company and team size.
    I rambled a bit so I hope that was helpful.
    Jord.
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