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Tyker

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  1. Like
    Tyker got a reaction from Interfearance in Complex   
    Haha, time for feedback!

    The red parts aren't walkable, but the green parts are. This is a bit confusing. I'd suggest either have them all walkable or none of them

    This dead end is a bit confusing. If you want this to be used, you could add a ladder. Otherwise you may end up better just deleting this dead end.

    In most maps you can open these, sit inside, and then surprise opponents. In this map, you cannot even open them. That's fine, but then place something infront of them so it visually suggest they cannot be used.

    You haven't detailed much yet, but this still looked weird enough for me to screenshot it.

    This elevator needs to go! Replace it with a wood wall or something bangable, but not visible. If you notice that red arrow, it's pointing towards a CTs head. It's just a bit of a mess to aim and shoot past. More fiddly than fun.

    Maybe you could add an outside building here to allow for smokes. This gives T side a bit more advantage, because currently...

    ...it looks mostly like this.

    The bomb can get stuck up there, it's circled. Also, this is another dead end that doesn't necessarily have to be there.

    The players can't see this, but I think the bomb can get stuck there. Maybe move the wall up a bit instead?

    This 'house-in-a-shipping-container' is neat, but in real life these would at least have some windows. This could also help making the map feel more like a whole. This is completely not gameplay related.

    Same goes here. Not gameplay related, just to give the map some more identity



    Why does this red route exist? The green one is faster anyway, and this red one is zig-zagging all over the place, which is annoying to walk through.

    Smoothing things would make it look better

    You could make these 2 hallways into a room, and then add cover with boxes or other things, which I indicated in green here. This could help make the level feel less hallway-y

    This spot can give the T side kind of a 'gotcha' feeling. As a CT, you would have to run all the way over and check it, otherwise you might get backstabbed. If that is your gameplay idea, cool! If not, maybe make it so players cannot 100% hide here, but are visible even a little bit.

    I really liked fighting here. Good grenade possibilities, it feels not like a hallway (even though it technically is), and the grates and fences make for fun shooting.

    I love seeing the crane all the way from the other site. It really gives the map a shape of identity and feel. It just looks cool!

    Add cubemaps for the next playtest! It's super fast to make them anyway, so it can't hurt, and every reflective surface in the map will look better for it!

    That's it for now. Remember my feedback is my opinion! You can disregard all of it if you want to, just use what you think can help your vision of the map.
  2. Like
    Tyker got a reaction from Pepperpot in de_nuke_zoo [New content resource]   
    Today I found out, via r/csmapmakers, that Valve also added a de_nuke_zoo.vmf to the update.
    It is amazing! It follows in the footsteps of the prop libraries A Boojum Snark made for TF2



    So if you want to get an eye for the new content, and see what has been made available, go take a look!
    You can find the vmf in your common\Counter-Strike Global Offensive\sdk_content\maps directory.
     
  3. Awesome
    Tyker reacted to General Vivi in The Door Challenge - 2018 - Submission Thread   
    Name: Jason "General Vivi" Mojica
    Website: www.generalvivi.com
    Story: You are a captured robot that has the special ability to stretch your arms infinitely. Escape your prison!
    Engine:  UE4
    Download Link: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1vGhB1WckfTkRyO90f1Ak-cLa8fY1PmtT/view?usp=sharing
    Screenshots:


     
    Video: 
     
  4. Like
    Tyker reacted to grapen in The Door Challenge - 2018 - Submission Thread   
    Name: Fredric Grapensparr
    Website: http://www.grapensparr.com/
    Story: You stumble upon a shrine hidden among the rocks. Use your curiosity to get inside.
    Engine: UE4
    Download Link: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1omOcgAM0KBjmBZPTqeg6gERtfMPL9SxW/
    Screenshots:


    Video link:
     
  5. Like
    Tyker reacted to vfig in The Door Challenge - 2018 - Submission Thread   
    Name: Andy Durdin
    Website: http://backslashn.com
    Story: A nuclear missile's headed your way. A nuclear bunker is right behind you. But its door is shut. You have two minutes to find a way inside.
    Engine: Source SDK
    Download Link: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1w42Dni15kSgP0HzI1KqOFV72CWExzw17 or door2_vfig.zip
    Screenshots:


    Video link:
     
  6. Like
    Tyker reacted to Klems in The Door Challenge - 2018 - Submission Thread   
    Name: Clément Baticle
    Website: http://klemss.baticle.com/
    Story: As you wake up one morning from uneasy dreams, you find yourself measuring less than 10 inches. The door handle is out of reach. How will you get out of your room?
    Engine: Source SDK
    Download Link: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1QtcfWlO-Is8Vy03MSt2x0Zfm9y01gGRu
    Screenshots:


    Video link: 
     
  7. Awesome
    Tyker reacted to FMPONE in The Door Challenge - 2018 - Submission Thread   
    Name: Shawn Snelling
    Story: The year is 2018. Half-Life 3 is released, disguised as yet another entry in a mapping forum contest. Our story begins in a quaint village in the sky, named "Fulcrum Town"...
    Engine: Source SDK
    Download Link: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1E9Pg5JJrb2lKyhSgtDbgaDGoEgJ8eeKm/view?usp=sharing
    Screenshots:

     
     
  8. Like
    Tyker reacted to Yanzl in Resort and Castle assets   
    Recent? D: Zoo was in the same operation as Resort! Anyway:
    Some stuff from Zoo: https://mega.nz/#!nx1HHLQT!9xvUHUogMVYYE16SqpUrWO6e8dtajt3wSwx1yqafsjE
    Some stuff from Cruise: https://mega.nz/#!ux8gDCaa!cvM3Lo9pkPiLOxrVgG8kZ4Gm1l1sALZl4qHhBHnwaJk
    Free for non-commercial use and all that.
  9. Like
    Tyker reacted to Yanzl in totally random texture thread   
    Speaking of Substance and CS:GO, I patched together a Source engine looking shader for substance.
    Get it here: http://gortnar.com/vmt/shaders.7z and put it in ...\Substance Designer 5\resources\view3d\shaders

    It has cubemap looking reflections and a phong specular highlight. Values in the shader are similar to these .vmt commants: Envmap Tint = $envmaptint, Specular Tint = $phongting, Specular Glosiness = $phongexponent, Specular Boost = $phongboost, but I don't think the numbers translate 100%, so you'd probably need to adjust a bit in the vmt to make it look the same. The parameters after Specular boost are for controlling the lighting inside the Substance Designer.
    And for creating presentable stuff for source I usually overlay a light node, ambient occlusion and curvature on top of diffuse.
  10. Like
    Tyker reacted to Skybex in The user experience of Level Editors   
    Well, glossed over in the sense that you are discussing such a complex topic in a one hour segment. So a little hard to understand just how much value each individual aspect has if unfamiliar with any of the tools. I personally believe that being able to run the game and editor in tandem and make real time changes is possibly the most powerful feature an editor can have.
  11. Like
    Tyker got a reaction from 2d-chris in The user experience of Level Editors   
    Sorry! I already had to cut so much good stuff when building the talk, and things had to go. Generally I'm still happy what the talk gave out as an idea, but originally I went over all 5 editors on each chapter. I loved doing this, and going into full detail, but sadly the time wasn't there. Even with those cuts, and talking super fast, I barely made it into 50 minutes. Please let me know what was erroneous though! I am not perfect, I do not know everything, and I'm always willing to learn.
    Yep, time constraints and cuts sadly had to happen, but as a general idea to share this knowledge (especially something I rarely hear people talk about) I'm still happy with it.
    True! I work the same way in hammer. One of the first iterations of the talk actually had me build the exact same house/room in each editor to show different workflows, but this was much too time consuming, and made it difficult to compare the editors as there was a lot of time inbetween the different features. This resulted in the final format, which in this way meant the creating of the brush & the editing/copying/moving of the brush were split up. So I do talk about both placing and copying/edit to create sections (Or if it feels like I didn't, please let me know if that wasn't clear!) the two topics are so separate it doesn't look like normal level design workflow. Thanks for letting me know, I did not realize that until now!
    It doesn't have to be easy to pickup, no. There is time to work with it and get used to it, but the section where I talk about the 'ok' button vs the 'x' button in the Skyrim Creation Kit (SCK) is exactly about this. "If you do something, you'll know for the future" is not always true. Many editors & tools have a problem that there are solely tool programmers involved and not designers, creating scenarios where the technical action is possible (pressing 'ok' or 'x') but the physical action of pressing them varies within a huge editor. The SCK is definitely not the only one to do this, of course. UX needs to focus more on what you are continually doing, again and again, and to make that smooth. Sure, level designers also need to deal with problems and bad tools sometimes, but if that goes too far, which it often does, then you reach that point of "Deal with it." and "A good designer/artist/developer doesn't blame their tools, and comes up with cool stuff regardless." which is incredibly detrimental both physically, mentally, and qualitatively, as I discuss in the talk.
    I think that reality can change. It will be slow, it will take incredible time and effort, but the end result will be worth it both for game developers and for game players.
    This is something I'm sad about that I did not mention it. This is the answer I would've loved to give to the question at the end concerning finding a tool for a game that has thousands and thousands of props: To find the right tool, and the right tool UX, you need to look at: Your company, the genre you're building, your publisher relations, your developer workflows, your time limit, the studio culture, the country culture, your budget, etc etc.  and then make an informed decision with all of those factors in mind. 
    I disagree, and this is where I think change needs to happen. Tools affect the end result of developers, both of experienced and inexperienced ones. If a badly placed exit button makes you lose 30 minutes of work, then your production, mood, and creative quality have just gone down. I won't say tools are everything anyone needs to make something awesome, but I also won't say tools matter less than the developer experience. If working with the editor is annoying enough to get a developer out of a good mood, it's not the fault of the developer, it's the fault of the tool. And we can fix tools. Telling developers to deal with bad UXd tools is reasonably okay, up to a point, but that point should not be 'running into the tool programmers room asking what the hell is going on', but should be 'getting annoyed over a consistently repeated action'. Again of course studio culture, time limit, budget, etc come into play, but the argument of how to do something becoming trivial and what to do becoming important is, in my opinion, not entirely accurate. It's missing a critical element. It's not just how to do something, or what to do, but in what way is it being done? If you have an awesome idea (what) and you know how to do it (how) but then you need to wrestle with a bad UXd editor to make it work (in what way) then you might not act on that awesome idea, or your creative energy will stop flowing because you will start to get annoyed, and then you might instead produce a less awesome idea in the end. Now the game is in a worse state purely due to bad editor UX. Experience might help here, but it's not a catch-all for these problems. In the end developers are only human. Bad tools can bring down amazing ideas and awesome games. You can punch through bad tools, and come out with awesome games, if you have enough willpower, force, budget, or time, but many times the sacrifices in final quality are not worth the small time it would take to fix a UI/UX issue.

    @Skybex's post also brought this same argument to light, and it's exactly how I feel, what I've heard, and what I've experienced in the industry. Amazing projects & ideas have been lost, just due to bad tools that human beings could not healthily deal with. Anything might be technically possible in an engine or editor, but it also has to be humanly possible.
    Thanks! And that's why I wanted to say in the above point: I disagree. I think it's useful to say that publicly, even though I may be talking to someone with more years of experience and a more senior position. I'm going to keep fighting for better tools & editors, not only so that developers enjoy work more, but also so I can play even better games!
  12. Like
    Tyker got a reaction from [HP] in The user experience of Level Editors   
    Hey everyone! A few months ago at GDC I gave a talk about the user experience of level editors. I talk about Unity, Unreal, Hammer, The Creation Kit, and 3dsMax from a level designer's perspective.
    It just went live on the GDC vault for free: http://gdcvault.com/play/1023235/Keeping-Level-Designers-in-the
     
    edit: Though it's a bit easier to watch on youtube: 
    I would love to hear your opinions on it! Have you had the same experiences? Or do you know of level editors that were particularly awesome, or particularly bad?
  13. Like
    Tyker reacted to 2d-chris in The user experience of Level Editors   
    This is interesting, but I feel a little too simplistic due to the time constraints of the presentation and assumptions on developers workflow, nevertheless it's a good rundown of a few of the many tasks performed in a level editors. For example, I don't know any designer who crates (pun intended) a new brush (bsp) for everything that they add, instead, you modify existing ones or duplicate them, and work from there, just that one change in workflow produces drastically different results for UX (for example in unreal you hold alt + drag mouse to duplicate anything) Additionally, where as first time UX of where buttons are is important, once you've learned how to do something, you'll know for the future, UX often focuses on actions that needs to be performed for the first time, and to make sure that they are not frustrating, which obviously makes a lot of sense for a game, but something as complicated as a level editor is never going to be easy to pickup, especially since new editors have to do so much more than older ones (yes hammer looking at you, still love you though) a complex action that must be performed many times often gets a special macro or tool written internally for it, and simple ones often get hotkeys, although personally I don't really master hotkeys in tools because when swapping around them it becomes a nightmare. 
    This is not to say that the UX experience of the tools doesn't matter, this is a great talk and a wish more people cared, it's just to say that every developer has their own preferences for workflow, some of the tricks I picked up at Epic make the hammer BSP method seem slow by comparison, it just requires that knowledge to be shared. The fact is that different developers use DRASTICALLY different workflows for creating levels, none of which are necessarily better or worse than each other, and this point alone makes comparisons complicated and messy, so by that point the best tool is the one that gives the most flexibility not necessarily the best  single optimised workflow. 
    It all boils down to, the overall package, and just like everything in life each has their pros and cons, I've been saying this for years, but the tools matter a lot less than the experience of the developers themselves (I've heard some comments in this industry that believe tools are everything and that they can replace experience!!) I've managed to master every editor I've come across pretty fast, because as mentioned they all do similar things, the knowledge of HOW to do something soon becomes trivial, and then the tricky question is WHAT to do, which unfortunately is not so easy to answer
    Flow is also important, but the realities of being a level designer in a studio pretty quickly ruins any chance of that, since you'll be interrupted or asking questions constantly, on the rare occasion it happens though, it's a wonderful thing
    Anyway, keep it up, thanks for being brave, tackling the subject and fighting for the user experience! 
  14. Like
    Tyker reacted to Skybex in The user experience of Level Editors   
    While I agree with most of what you said, I cannot agree on this part. Unity/Unreals method of click dragging meshes into the editor is unquestionably better than hammers and the creation kits. The same goes for many of the aspects spoken about such as preview images, search tagging or custom libraries, testing the game in editor and many more. There are so many things with some of these engines that is just a step above completely unusable or broken, mostly so with Hammer and the Creation Engine.
    And something @Tyker didn't specifically mention, but maybe implied. Is bad UX not only causes worse work to be performed, but in some cases no work performed at all. I can't count how many times in hammer I have abandoned ideas simply because I cant be bothered to go through the model importing nightmare or mess with the VMT's to bother with a texture. I know something is bad, but don't care to improve it at all. And since I love Skyrim and Fallout so much I would have loved to work on a mod for them, but one look at their toolset instantly puts you off. Games using Hammer and the Creation engine are the most modded games out there, but their toolsets are absolutely terrible and I have to wonder how much UGC is lost because of how bad they are.
    Also a shame you wasn't able to speak about flowgraph as well as in editor animation systems, such a huge time saver that is so powerful short and long term.
  15. Like
    Tyker got a reaction from Skybex in The user experience of Level Editors   
    Hey everyone! A few months ago at GDC I gave a talk about the user experience of level editors. I talk about Unity, Unreal, Hammer, The Creation Kit, and 3dsMax from a level designer's perspective.
    It just went live on the GDC vault for free: http://gdcvault.com/play/1023235/Keeping-Level-Designers-in-the
     
    edit: Though it's a bit easier to watch on youtube: 
    I would love to hear your opinions on it! Have you had the same experiences? Or do you know of level editors that were particularly awesome, or particularly bad?
  16. Like
    Tyker got a reaction from 2d-chris in The user experience of Level Editors   
    Hey everyone! A few months ago at GDC I gave a talk about the user experience of level editors. I talk about Unity, Unreal, Hammer, The Creation Kit, and 3dsMax from a level designer's perspective.
    It just went live on the GDC vault for free: http://gdcvault.com/play/1023235/Keeping-Level-Designers-in-the
     
    edit: Though it's a bit easier to watch on youtube: 
    I would love to hear your opinions on it! Have you had the same experiences? Or do you know of level editors that were particularly awesome, or particularly bad?
  17. Like
    Tyker got a reaction from Lizard in The user experience of Level Editors   
    Hey everyone! A few months ago at GDC I gave a talk about the user experience of level editors. I talk about Unity, Unreal, Hammer, The Creation Kit, and 3dsMax from a level designer's perspective.
    It just went live on the GDC vault for free: http://gdcvault.com/play/1023235/Keeping-Level-Designers-in-the
     
    edit: Though it's a bit easier to watch on youtube: 
    I would love to hear your opinions on it! Have you had the same experiences? Or do you know of level editors that were particularly awesome, or particularly bad?
  18. Like
    Tyker got a reaction from Psyrius in The user experience of Level Editors   
    Hey everyone! A few months ago at GDC I gave a talk about the user experience of level editors. I talk about Unity, Unreal, Hammer, The Creation Kit, and 3dsMax from a level designer's perspective.
    It just went live on the GDC vault for free: http://gdcvault.com/play/1023235/Keeping-Level-Designers-in-the
     
    edit: Though it's a bit easier to watch on youtube: 
    I would love to hear your opinions on it! Have you had the same experiences? Or do you know of level editors that were particularly awesome, or particularly bad?
  19. Like
    Tyker got a reaction from TheOnlyDoubleF in The user experience of Level Editors   
    Hey everyone! A few months ago at GDC I gave a talk about the user experience of level editors. I talk about Unity, Unreal, Hammer, The Creation Kit, and 3dsMax from a level designer's perspective.
    It just went live on the GDC vault for free: http://gdcvault.com/play/1023235/Keeping-Level-Designers-in-the
     
    edit: Though it's a bit easier to watch on youtube: 
    I would love to hear your opinions on it! Have you had the same experiences? Or do you know of level editors that were particularly awesome, or particularly bad?
  20. Like
    Tyker reacted to clankill3r in The user experience of Level Editors   
    here is the youtube link:
     
     
  21. Like
    Tyker got a reaction from Bastion in The user experience of Level Editors   
    Hey everyone! A few months ago at GDC I gave a talk about the user experience of level editors. I talk about Unity, Unreal, Hammer, The Creation Kit, and 3dsMax from a level designer's perspective.
    It just went live on the GDC vault for free: http://gdcvault.com/play/1023235/Keeping-Level-Designers-in-the
     
    edit: Though it's a bit easier to watch on youtube: 
    I would love to hear your opinions on it! Have you had the same experiences? Or do you know of level editors that were particularly awesome, or particularly bad?
  22. Like
    Tyker reacted to Yanzl in [CS:GO]de_thrill   
    Last update before release, starting to come together.




     

     


     
  23. Like
    Tyker reacted to Squeebo in The user experience of Level Editors   
    I agree with a lot of what you said; nice to see someone bring up a lot of these talking points and to know there's someone who shares some of these frustrations. I do hope some UX/UI developers take heed.
    Thanks for posting.
  24. Like
    Tyker got a reaction from Furiosa in The user experience of Level Editors   
    Hey everyone! A few months ago at GDC I gave a talk about the user experience of level editors. I talk about Unity, Unreal, Hammer, The Creation Kit, and 3dsMax from a level designer's perspective.
    It just went live on the GDC vault for free: http://gdcvault.com/play/1023235/Keeping-Level-Designers-in-the
     
    edit: Though it's a bit easier to watch on youtube: 
    I would love to hear your opinions on it! Have you had the same experiences? Or do you know of level editors that were particularly awesome, or particularly bad?
  25. Like
    Tyker got a reaction from marnamai in The user experience of Level Editors   
    Hey everyone! A few months ago at GDC I gave a talk about the user experience of level editors. I talk about Unity, Unreal, Hammer, The Creation Kit, and 3dsMax from a level designer's perspective.
    It just went live on the GDC vault for free: http://gdcvault.com/play/1023235/Keeping-Level-Designers-in-the
     
    edit: Though it's a bit easier to watch on youtube: 
    I would love to hear your opinions on it! Have you had the same experiences? Or do you know of level editors that were particularly awesome, or particularly bad?
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